Birth

To My Sweet Baby

baby-in-bellyTo My Sweet Baby

I trust your wisdom; I have faith that you know better than any of us earthside.

I know the veil is so thin for you that you are connected to the truth.

I will not interfere with that pureness.

I will only have patience trust and faith.

I know the discomfort I am feeling is only physical. I know it will not last. I know that it will vanish the moment you are in my arms.

I will only feel the ecstasy of birthing you and giving you life.

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What are the Benefits of practicing Yoga?

Prenatal Benefits

The word yoga derives from the Sanskrit yuj, which means ‘to join’, ‘yoke’ or ‘coming together’. The practice of yoga is a union of the soul, the mind, the emotions and the physical body. So taking a prenatal yoga class is one of the best things you can do for yourself and your baby when you are pregnant. When yoga is practiced regularly, we develop an understanding of our own nature, our physical bodies become more subtle and strong and balance can be established in all parts of our being.

Taking a regular prenatal yoga class will help alleviate some common pregnancy discomforts including;

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Delayed Cord Clamping

To all the lovely yoga mums, hello and welcome to jen’s blog.

Following on from our discussions last Wednesday evening with Meg about placenta’s I thought we could explore a simplistic look at how women have birthed their babies and placenta’s since time immemorial…

I like to think of a cave women giving birth. Once her baby is out, she and her birth attendants would pick the baby up and put him to the mums breast. The mumma would cuddle her baby and keep him warm. All the attending birth assistants would smile and enjoy the beautiful scene. Then at some point the umbilical cord would be cut, possibly using a sharp rock.

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Squatting for Pregnancy and Birth

Squatting has been used for childbirth since ancient times as it is the natural, instinctive way for women to birth their babies.

However, from Victorian times until the later part of the twentieth century, women in western countries were usually required to deliver their babies lying on their backs, a position which can make birth more difficult.

The story goes that Louis XV1 wanted to see the birth of his son and asked the obstetrician if he could place the queen (Marie Antoinette) on her back with her legs extended so as to facilitate this. The obstetrician realised that this position made things easier for him as well; he didn’t have to stoop down and look up at the women.

So this practise continued with most obstetricians then picking up on the practise. Victorian times it was also considered unnatural and immodest to deliver in any other way.

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Pain in Labour: Your hormones are your helpers

The altered shape of the pelvis and birth outlet that is caused by our upright stance; our babies need to twist and turn to navigate these unique bends. Even our nearest cousins, the great apes, have a near-straight birth canal.

However, in every other way, human birth is like that of other mammals — those animals that suckle their young — and involves the same hormones: the body’s chemical messengers. These hormones, which originate in the deepest and oldest parts of our brain, cause the physical processes of labour and birth, as well as exerting a powerful influence on our emotions and behaviour.

Researchers such as French surgeon and natural birth pioneer Michel Odent believe that if we can be more respectful of our mammalian roots, and the hormones that we share, we can have more chance of a straightforward birth ourselves.

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